Gene Siciliano's blog

Do You Really Have Enough Cash?

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Do you really have enough cash? Let me be more specific: Do you really have enough cash for the next horrific event in your industry?

Are Succession Plans and Exit Plans the Same?

Gene Siciliano's Profile

A business writer once published an article that an exit plan can also be referred to as a succession plan. Sorry, folks, but that’s just not true.

Business Planning is Crap

Gene Siciliano's Profile

Catchy title, eh? But it must be true, because so few small and mid-sized companies do it. Why would anyone who wants to build a successful company avoid doing something that might help them succeed? Well there are a lot of very solid reasons, or so we’re told. In fact, we’ve been told one or more of those reasons so often that I made a list of them for my last book.

If Cash is King, What's the King Doing Anyway?,

Gene Siciliano's Profile

Virtually every CEO or business owner knows how to read their company’s income statement – Revenue, then Gross Profit, then Operating Profit, then Net Profit. Many only look at the top and bottom numbers, some delve deeply into the details in between.

Dealing With CFO Retirement

Gene Siciliano's Profile

The Wall Street Journal reported that CFOs of public companies are retiring at the fastest pace in over a decade.

Avoiding Pain in Systems Transitions

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About Knitting and Systems Evolution

Alert: This is not a techie post about bits and bytes. It’s about making good decisions when your internal growth requires support from outside your company in an area that is not your area of expertise. And it’s from an actual case history, although the end to the story is yet to be written.

Ideas for addressing your labor shortage

Gene Siciliano's Profile

Ideas for addressing your labor shortage

Dealing With CFO Retirement

Gene Siciliano's Profile

The Wall Street Journal reported recently (7/18/19) that CFOs of public companies are retiring at the fastest pace in over a decade. Exit rates of nearly 18% annually are now thought to be higher than for CEOs, a historically high turnover job. The trend, captured by a survey commissioned by the Journal, is said to be the result of a variety of factors:

“I didn’t know” is still a loser’s defense

Gene Siciliano's Profile

When I wrote my first book, Finance for Non-Financial Managers, it opened with then-current stories of CEOs whose companies had been caught gaming their financial reporting, while the CEOs claimed they didn’t know because they weren’t accountants, or some such excuse.